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FOLK MUSIC FROM IRELAND & SCOTLAND
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PO BOX 1256
TALENT, OR 97540
Phone: (541) 326-6808
Contact: Bronagh Keigher

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Workshop

The following is an example of the fifty minute program:

INTRODUCTION
Who we are.
Where we are from.
How we met.
Why we play music.

PLAY TWO REELS
This features tenor banjo and mando-cello on one reel and tenor banjo and bodhran on the second melody. Also, an introduction to the instruments used in this segment, and their use in providing the music for Irish and Scottish traditional dancing. An example of dances being Reels, Jigs, and Hornpipes.

SING "SOUND THE PIBROCH"
Performed on the bodhrans, this song about the 1745 struggle for Scottish independence has an English verse and a Gaelic chorus. The chorus is easy to learn and sounds very powerful when the students join in. The outcome of this story has parallels in Irish history as well, and thus leads into the nect part of the hourney, emigration.

SING "DESTINATION DONEGAL"
A fine example of one of the many songs about emigration to America and Canada. It speaks about fond remembrance and the hope of liberty and freedom in the New World. The two instruments used are the mando-cello and the concertina. The concertina was made in London in 1835; emigration was also taking flight at about the same time. It also sheds light on the hardship of the traveler of that time compared to the traveler or tourist of today. Back then a lot of people didn't get to finish the journey. Today we are there in ten hours and we may have already seen the movie.

GAELIC MOUTH-MUSIC SELECTION

Here instruments from the mandolin family are used, the octave mandolin and the mando-cello. The regular size mandolin is also shown; this helps to visualize the differences between instruments of the same musical family. The song is used to highlight the need to self-entertain as children before the infusion of TV, and the opportunity the long northern summers of Scotland and Ireland bring. Playing outside at ten at night and daylight still around!

QUESTION TIME
Depending on the time, approximately a dozen questions can be addressed by the students; also teachers are encouraged to ask a question or two. Final selection: reel, jig, and hornpipe performed on guitar and octave mandolin. This is a lively conclusion to the presentation and it is also used in Irish step dancing.




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